Working into the workforce

Smithton High School students (from left) Lara Porteus-Smith, 14, Piper Grey, 15, Sophie Furphy, 15, Lily Nibbs, 15 and Jaz Martin, 15, with Commonwealth Bank customer service specialist Alana Jago, Circular Head Council engineering project coordinator James Brewer and strategics planner Benji Krom at the Work Inspirations program last week. Pictures: Ashleigh Force.

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Careers. Smithton High School students gained an insight into the workforce in Circular Head last week as part of the Work Inspirations program.

Funded by Circular Head Council through the Circular Head Education and Training Consultive Committee, the program provides young people with a look at the working world.

Held across two days, the model is built around three components: All About Me, Behind the Scenes and Careers Happen.

“The focus of the program is to get kids thinking about what is out there and expose them to local organisations,” says Amber Power, community development officer at Circular Head Council.

First off, students completed a personality test to gain an idea of the career choices that will match the individual’s talents, passions and interests before taking to the streets of Smithton on Thursday to find out what goes on behind the scenes of local businesses.

Chatting to employees at Circular Head Council, Emmerton Park, Tall Timbers Tasmania, Roberts Limited, Tasmanian Dairy Products and Britton Timbers, students gained an idea of the various roles that are available through each organisation.

On Friday, local faces in business met with the students to provide insight into how they came to be where they are today. Following these small group sessions, students were required to create a storyboard of the mentor’s career path.

The program, aimed at year nine students, is designed to give students an idea of what is out there before starting year 10.

“[It’s about] giving them that exposure before they go out to work experience, and starting to think about their future,” says Amber.

Receiving positive feedback, students said they gained a greater idea of the opportunities available and the direction they might need to take to reach those goals.

“Talking to people in those industries has made me understand it more, what actually goes on in businesses,” says year nine student Lara Porteus-Smith, 14, adding that as technology and industries evolve, new jobs are continually created.