Philmac Project water grants now open

Apply. Less than three weeks remain for community organisations across regional Tasmania to apply for cash grants as part of an initiative set up to say ‘thank you’ to rural Australia.

The Philmac Project provides individual grants of up to $5000 to local organisations wanting to carry out water-related projects that benefit rural and regional communities.

Last year, Smithton High School students Callum Poke and Jarod Elphinstone helped their school receive a $1000 grant as part of the initiative.

Their idea – created while the pair studied in an Applied Science class –  involved a water-recycling system from a fish tank to the nearby garden beds, providing a sustainable method for plants to grow.

Applicants have until Friday October 2 to answer a few basic questions as part of a streamlined online application process. They then have until mid-October to muster up some votes for their proposed project.

The popular funding scheme was set up three years ago by Philmac – a global leader in the design and manufacture of specialist fittings and valves for transferring, controlling and applying water.

“It’s our way of giving something back to the people that have stood by us, despite challenging times,” Philmac managing director Mark Nykiel said of the grants program.

“Ultimately, we are looking for projects that will make a genuine difference to their local community, and have the potential to reduce water use, improve water quality or benefit the environment in some way.”

The five projects in each Philmac Project region that attract the most votes will be short-listed for final judging by an expert panel, with recipients announced in late October.

Judges will also award discretionary product grants valued at up to $5000, to entries that offer a high level of community value but have not attracted significant votes. Every community group that applies is automatically in the running for these grants, known as the Bluey Awards.

For more information visit www.philmacproject.com.au.

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