Generations past, present

Tim Broom and Fran Joyce capture a different scene of Smithton in their latest works in Emmett Street. Picture: Ashleigh Force.

Creation. A scene portraying Smithton in another time now looks out across Emmett Street.

The mural, recently completed by local artists Fran Joyce and Tim Broom, intrigued passersby during its creation.

“It has generated a huge amount of conversation,” says Joyce.

“Our history has played a part in many different ways and looked different throughout those times . . . Revisiting that past, particularly for older people who could pick out the makes of cars, was really interesting to see.”

The concept comes from a photo Broom captured of handlebars on a motorcycle with the reflection of Hellyer Beach in the mirror’s view.

This idea was adapted to capture the history of Smithton.

Fellow locals Ashley and Colleen Gale modelled for the artists, sitting front seat in a 1948 Ford purchased at a Circular Head Show many years ago. From the backseat of the Ford, Joyce captured the pair driving along Emmett Street.

In the mural, as the car travels the main street the driver and passenger look out to a view of Smithton in the 1950s while behind them in the rear vision mirror is a scene of the town in the ’20s.

These scenes are based upon photographs collected from the Circular Head Heritage Centre.

“We both have a love of history,” says Joyce.

“Smithton has never really been known for its beauty but in a way, looking back it looks so romantic and beautiful.”

Broom says the process began by using a stencil to establish the outline of the mural before completing the final details with brush.

In the first work the couple has undertaken together, the process was a learning curve for each of them: “Especially Tim who is a spraypainter with his stencil art so using a paintbrush was different,” says Joyce.

Planning to create the piece in colour, the artists decided on a black and white street splashed with pastel coloured cars.

They spent more than 100 hours creating the piece and even longer finalising the design.

“It started off completely different to what it has evolved into,” says Broom.

Adding finer details here and there, the couple themselves feature in the mural. Look closely to find Broom and Joyce walking the street with beloved pup Ollie – recognisable from various works around town.

Broom says he has further plans to create a ‘Where’s Ollie?’ series with three Ollie inspired pieces already dotted throughout Smithton

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