Dads catch reading bug

Literacy. Children from across Circular Head have been busy reading to a very special egg in the hope that it will hatch, and local dads are joining in the fun.

Discovered in Smithton last month, the Reading Bug Egg has since been a feature at events such as the Lighting of the Tree, Circular Head Show and Wedge Street Market, where children have had the chance to read to it, or listen to adults read to them.

The egg is currently touring thanks to Rural Health’s HIPPY staff and with support from the Circular Head Education and Training Consultative Committee.

HIPPY coordinator Leanne Marsden said the egg is hoped to help foster a love of learning and enthusiasm for reading in the Circular Head community.

As well as prominent locals, including Annette Dawes, local dads have jumped onboard to promote the importance of books and to share photos of the quality time spent reading to their children.

Smithton dad Leigh Williams says reading has always played an “important role in our family time”, admitting the home is “littered with books”.

“I started reading to my boys when they were newborns and intend to continue for many year to come,” he said.

“I often find books in bed with my children long after they are asleep. I know that this love of books has set them up for success and I encourage others to join the fun that is reading with your children.”

During the school holidays, children can catch up with the egg at Smithton Library from Monday January 5, and enter the drawing competition.

If any parents would like assistance in reading, visit Sabena at the library.

For more information about HIPPY contact Rural Health on 6452 1286.

“Literacy is an important life skill and I would love my son to enjoy reading as I do.” Andrew Pilkington with son Charlie, six months.

“Literacy is an important life skill and I would love my son to enjoy reading as I do.” Andrew Pilkington with son Charlie, six months.

“Literacy is an important life skill and I would love my son to enjoy reading as I do.” Andrew Pilkington with son Charlie, six months.

“We read as a family every night before bed-time. It’s nice to have a bit of routine and it’s a great way to wind down together. We all love our reading!” Jeff Power with Leila, 6, Xander, 7, and Tilly 3.

“We read as a family every night before bed-time. It’s nice to have a bit of routine and it’s a great way to wind down together. We all love our reading!” Jeff Power with Leila, 6, Xander, 7, and Tilly 3.

“We read as a family every night before bed-time. It’s nice to have a bit of routine and it’s a great way to wind down together. We all love our reading!” Jeff Power with Leila, 6, Xander, 7, and Tilly 3.

“Lila-Rae and Frankie love getting books read to them with animals in them, especially dogs or cats. They’re obsessed with dogs and puppies!” Koel Nicholls with one-year-old twins.

“Lila-Rae and Frankie love getting books read to them with animals in them, especially dogs or cats. They’re obsessed with dogs and puppies!” Koel Nicholls with one-year-old twins.

“Lila-Rae and Frankie love getting books read to them with animals in them, especially dogs or cats. They’re obsessed with dogs and puppies!” Koel Nicholls with one-year-old twins.

Leigh Williams has been reading to his children from an early age. Zane (now five) at 15 months and Kale at 3.

Leigh Williams has been reading to his children from an early age. Zane (now five) at 15 months and Kale at 3.

Leigh Williams has been reading to his children from an early age. Zane (now five) at 15 months and Kale at 3.

 

“It is very important that parents, in particular fathers read to their children. It helps fathers fill the role of teacher and supporter of education.” Paul Niven with Ted, 7, and Adelaide, 8.

“It is very important that parents, in particular fathers read to their children. It helps fathers fill the role of teacher and supporter of education.” Paul Niven with Ted, 7, and Adelaide, 8.

“It is very important that parents, in particular fathers read to their children. It helps fathers fill the role of teacher and supporter of education.” Paul Niven with Ted, 7, and Adelaide, 8.

“Just a good time for both of us.” Peter Hutton reading to grandson Judd, 3.

“Just a good time for both of us.” Peter Hutton reading to grandson Judd, 3.

“Just a good time for both of us.” Peter Hutton reading to grandson Judd, 3.

http://www.chchronicle.com.au/advertisements/tall-timbers/

Fatal error: Call to undefined function related_posts() in /clientdata/apache-www/c/h/chchronicle.com.au/www/Newspaper/wp-content/themes/Print-Domain/single.php on line 30